Winter Raisin Scones

The last time I made scones I could feel winter in bones. (No ryhme intended)

Winter is coming. I can feel it in my bones. Under a long sleeve shirt and fleece, REI wool socks, pajama pants, and three blankets. I should probably add some more layers.

It’s all my fellow Peace Corps Volunteers are talking about on Facebook.

I haven’t sweated profusely in a few months now. It’s no longer a pain to wear scarves and long pants. Not to mention that I don’t have to worry too much about keeping my dress ‘culturally appropriate’ since the only way to stay warm these days is to pile on the layers.

Winter is reflected in my language learning, as I have now picked up the words for ‘clouds’ and ‘umbrella.’ Now instead of talking about hot it is, I talk about how cold it is with everyone from the kurti at the taxi stand to the security guard at the post office.

It’s present in the foods I eat. Gone are the figs and cactus fruit, replaced by the heartier and beloved pomegranites. I’ve had the pleasure of eating pumpkin in my cous cous. And these days, I look forward to a hot cup of tea.

And just the other morning, I woke up to spy a light dusting of snow on the tops of the mountains. (I live in the foothills of the Middle Atlas Mountains)

Seemed about right to make scones.

Winter Raisin Scones

Adapted from the Peace Corps Morocco Kitchen Guide, Makes 16 scones

4 c flour

2 pkg baking powder

1 t salt

1/2 c sugar

2 pkg vanilla sugar

1 T lemon zest

3/4 c butter

1 c raisins

2 eggs, beaten

1 c buttermilk (lbn)

Combine all dry ingredients, then cut in butter until mixture looks like fine crumbs. Add in raisins and lemon zest. Stir in eggs and lbn. Knead on a lightly floured surface. Divide dough into quarters. Pat each section into 6″ diameter circle. Cut each circle into quarters. Bake at 375 (190 F) for 25 minutes.

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3 Comments

Filed under Food, Food Photography, Musings, Recipes

3 responses to “Winter Raisin Scones

  1. Wonderful! They look rustic and absolutely delicious!

  2. Pingback: The Art of Doing Nothing, Or How I Spend My Free Time | Post Grad Mel

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